Samples descriptive essays

The forms of Ovid, Catullus, Propertius, served a society different, and in some respects more civilized, than any of these; and in the society of Ovid the drama as a form of art was comparatively insignificant. But it is these and such like passions which Music is fittest for imitating, and which it in fact most frequently imitates. Yes, he forgot the lowly mien, The holy mass, the rosary, And all that he had ever been, For hopeless love and misery. He who would tread this borderland must tread softly. They say, that no such necessity, nor any positive reason whatever can be conceived to exist for my promoting the welfare of another, since I cannot possibly feel the pleasures, or pains which another feels without first becoming that other, that our interests must be as necessarily distinct as we ourselves are, that the good which I do to another, in itself and for it’s own sake can be nothing to me. Early in the second half of the first year, a child in good health will begin to surmount the alarms of the ear, and to turn what is new and strange into fun. When we say that future objects act upon the mind by means of the imagination, it is not meant that such objects exercise a real power over the imagination, but merely that it is by means of this faculty that we can foresee the probable or necessary consequences of things, and are interested in them. They are all growth-products. Look at our working millionaires! In the straits in the gulph of Paria, the motion is so violent, that it has received the appellation of the Dragon’s Mouth. The Question I shall at present handle is, whether the time an ingenious Gentleman spends in the Company of Women, may justly be said to be misemploy’d, or not? How soon in man’s history any such laughter became {265} possible, it would be hard to say. This is virtually admitted by all who recognise the Intellectual and the Moral principle; for our laughter at seeing dignity unfrocked is presumably of more ancient origin than the “laughter of the mind,” which discoursers on the ludicrous are for the most part thinking of. Luck may not only be “in” but “of” the library. A presentation which differs widely from those of the ordinary type, and so has a stimulating freshness, may, as we have seen, when agreeable and of sufficient force, excite to laughter by suddenly relieving the dulness of the common and oft-repeated, and raising the feeling-tone of the observer to the level of joyous excitement. But what an advantage a man like M. Rather should we do away with that output altogether. I once thought indeed I had him at a disadvantage, but I was mistaken. His attitude was vastly more intelligent than that of some persons who appear to think that a good librarian in a fine building ought to produce satisfactory results without any books at all. We should, however, remember, as Professor Ward points out, before we apply the formul? Adam and others interested in American languages, and M. John T. It is composed of bluish mud, with occasional patches of brown clay, and extends several yards along the beach. Cooper, in his “Statutes at Large of South Carolina,” writing in 1837, seems to think that both the wager of battle and appeal of death were still legally in force there at that time.[817] So Chancellor Kilty, in his Report on English Statutes applicable to Maryland, made in 1811, apparently considers that the appeal of death was still legally existent, but regards it as unimportant in view of the pardoning power and other considerations.[818] III. Thus in the latter half of the sixteenth century it was believed that a fragment of earth from a grave, when sanctified in the Mass and placed on the threshold of a church door, would prevent the egress of any witch who might be within; and a similar power was attributed to a splinter of oak from a gallows, sprinkled with holy water and hung up in the church porch.[1207] CHAPTER XV. It is impossible to conceive the delicacy that was observed towards him. Now this solution would not have been attained but for the deep impression which the operation of certain general causes of moral character had recently made, and the quickness with which the consequences of its removal were felt. Art gives us many examples of this merriment over what is decaying and growing effete. With regard to language, this is obvious. I have said that in distribution we bring to the individual what he wants or what he needs. What a check it is to be asked a foolish question; to find that the first principles are not understood! The relation may not be apprehended in a perfectly precise way; but the point is that it is mentally seized, if only for the fraction of a second; and, further, that a degree of definiteness is given to the apprehension of the relation by a glimpse, at least, of the related terms. In a study of the art-products of Mexico and Central America, it has occurred to me that we may with advantage call linguistics to our aid, and attempt to ascertain, by an analysis of the words for weights and measures, what units, if any, were employed by those who constructed the massive works in that region, which still remain for our astonishment. Why so? Addison does, that the complete art of a musician, the complete merit of a piece of Music, is composed or made up of three distinct arts or merits, that of melody, that of harmony, and that of expression, is to say, that it is made up of melody and harmony, and of the immediate and necessary effect of melody and harmony: the division is by no means logical; expression in painting is not the necessary effect either of good drawing or of good colouring, or of both together; a picture may be both finely drawn and finely coloured, and yet have very little expression: but that effect upon the mind which is called expression in Music, is the immediate and necessary effect of good melody. Such ornaments, not having in that country been degraded by their vulgarity, have not yet been excluded from the gardens of princes and lords. It is miserable, we think, to be deprived of the light of the sun; to be shut out from life and {13} conversation; to be laid in the cold grave, a prey to corruption and the reptiles of the earth; to be no more thought of in this world, but to be obliterated, in a little time, from the affections, and almost from the memory, of samples descriptive essays their dearest friends and relations. During its application it could be stopped and resumed at the pleasure of the judge, but if the accused were once unbound and removed from the rack, it could not be repeated, even though additional evidence were subsequently obtained.[1632] It was well to prescribe limitations, slender as these were; but in practice it was found impossible to enforce them, and they afforded little real protection to the accused when judges, bent upon procuring conviction, chose to evade them. We further samples descriptive essays know that this race was not that which occupied the land when the whites discovered it; for the human skulls disinterred from the sambaquis are, craniologically, almost diametrically opposite those of the Botocudos and the Tupis. suffer any personal restraint, and not one for years under any constant personal coercion, and we have, at times, been for months together with not more than one patient whom we were afraid of trusting in the grounds alone. The unfolding of our experience is long and voluminous; nor do we all at once recover from our surprise at the number of objects that distract our attention. We cannot, even in imagination, conceive an object of Touch to be prolonged into an object of Sight, or an object of Sight into an object of Touch. But perhaps the clearest disproof of this quaint paradox in the realm of laughter is supplied by the situation already referred to, that of forced abstention from a choral laugh through fatigue. But, as was formerly taken notice of, we have no precise rules to determine what external actions are due from a regard to such motives, nor, consequently, when it is that those virtues are inconsistent with the observance of such promises. Every electric current will stop unless a continuous electro-motive force is behind it; every river will dry up unless fed by living springs. Reduced to his natural weapons, he could only inflict blows with the fist, which failing strength rendered less and less effective, when a scaffold crowded with ladies and gentlemen gave way, throwing down the spectators in a shrieking mass. Though their characters are in general much less correct, and their merit much inferior to that of the man of real and modest virtue; yet their excessive presumption, founded upon their own excessive self-admiration, dazzles the multitude, and often imposes even upon those who are much superior to the multitude. It then occurred to him, that, if the Earth was supposed to revolve every day round its axis, from west to east, all the heavenly bodies would appear to revolve, in a contrary direction, from east to west. Men have voluntarily thrown away life to acquire after death a renown which they could no longer enjoy. An attempt, however, which was indispensably necessary to complete the coherence of the Newtonian system. It is well that there should be a little mystery between the librarian and his public–a consciousness of problems yet to solve, of service yet to be rendered. Its point of view seems on inquiry {411} to justify itself as a distinct and a legitimate one. How, then, can we hope to get at them when they are hidden in the darkness of the remote past? Any one may lay claim to it who is willing to give himself airs of importance, and can find means to divert others from inquiring too strictly into his pretensions. It is in this manner that a man born blind, or who has lost his sight so early that he has no remembrance of visible objects, may form the most distinct idea of the extent and figure of all the different parts of his own body, and of every other tangible object which he has an opportunity of handling and examining. Grotius seems to have been the first who attempted to give the world any thing like a system of those principles which ought to run through, and be the foundation of the laws of all nations; and his treatise of the laws of war and peace, with all its imperfections, is perhaps at this day the most complete work that has yet been given upon this subject. I have said that I know; probably you think that you do; but as a matter of fact our knowledge is neither comprehensive nor accurate.

In a similar manner suffixes or postpositions affect the form of the words to which they are added. In all genuinely hilarious moods, the laugh is accompanied by a good deal of diffused activity of the voluntary muscles. In cases of this kind, when we are determining the degree of blame or applause which seems due to any action, we very frequently make use of two different standards. ??? The writer has no difficulty in finding examples of the stiff mechanical effects which amuse us, say, in gestures and carriage. It recals the same feelings and associations which I had in first reading it, and which I can never have again in any other way. There are still things that one must learn by heart, but since they must be retained below the threshold of consciousness, it is well that if possible they should also be acquired below that threshold. It should include the biographies of its principal divines and laymen. But could he have clutched them all, and melted them into one essence of pride, the triumph would not have been lasting. Both were renowned warriors, but Herman was speedily unhorsed by his adversary, who with his lance frustrated all his attempts to remount. When we think of the anguish of the sufferers, we take part with them more earnestly against their oppressors; samples descriptive essays we enter with more eagerness into all their schemes of vengeance, and feel ourselves every {70} moment wreaking, in imagination, upon such violators of the laws of society, that punishment which our sympathetic indignation tells us is due to their crimes. Some exertion of manhood and self-command is even necessary for this sort of restraint; and the impartial spectator may sometimes view it with that sort of cold esteem due to that species of conduct which he considers as a mere matter of vulgar prudence; but never with that affectionate admiration with which he surveys the same passions, when, by the sense of propriety, they are moderated and subdued to what he himself can readily enter into. Among his other selfish passions, vanity is one of the strongest, and he is always easily flattered and greatly delighted with the applauses of those about him. This, it must be confessed, is very unlike Burke: yet Mr. But it should require that every effort be made to see that no section of the books on the library shelves shall lie idle and that no section of the community shall fail to use books, either through ignorance or through doubt of a welcome. “Is he lucky?” Napoleon used to ask when anyone was recommended to him. When a chorus is singing with orchestral accompaniment the result is not a hundred sound waves, but one; it strikes the ear drum as a unit, and that vibrates as a unit, so that the impression on the brain, about whose mechanism we are ignorant, must also be a unit. Opposite appearances are always immediately incompatible with each other, and cannot therefore be deduced from the same immediate cause, but samples descriptive essays must be accounted for from a combination of different causes, the discovery of which is an affair of comprehension, and not of mere abstraction. As we cannot indeed enter thoroughly into the gratitude of the person who receives the benefit, unless we beforehand approve of the motives of the benefactor, so, upon this account, the sense of merit seems to be a compounded sentiment, and to be made up of two distinct emotions; a direct sympathy with the sentiments of the agents, and an indirect sympathy with the gratitude of those who receive the benefit of his actions. As the selfish passions, according to what has formerly been observed, hold, in other respects, a sort of middle place, between the social and unsocial affections, so do they likewise in this. This revolution of the Sun, too, was neither directly westwards, nor exactly circular; but after the Summer Solstice, his motion began gradually to decline a little southwards, appearing in his meridian to-day, further south than yesterday; and to-morrow still further south than to-day; and thus continuing every day to describe a spiral line round the Earth, which carried him gradually further and further southwards, till he arrived at the Winter Solstice. The frivolous mind, hardly touched by the gravity of the occasion, will, no doubt, often be the first to welcome the delivering hand. Any other artificial, and general connection between our ideas (as that of the same species) might as well pass for association. I am not sure that we are right in objecting to this procedure. The human aggregate is in all cases less advanced than the individual; it is more primitive in its emotions, its morals, its acts. No other word of the class has such a wide significance. His disappearance having naturally been attributed to foul play, his kindred prosecuted an enemy of the family, who, under stress of torture, duly confessed to having committed the murder, and was accordingly executed in a town where Masserano himself was residing.[1688] Godelmann relates that a monument in a church in upper Germany, representing a man broken on a wheel, commemorated a case in which two young journeymen set out together to make the accustomed tour of the country. The different passions and appetites, the natural subjects of this ruling principle, but which are so apt to rebel against their master, he reduced to two different classes or orders. I regard it as quite sufficient, therefore, when a librarian grades his staff, that he should simply report to his board that he is about to make certain dispositions and require certain tests to aid him in making proper recommendations for appointment and promotion, and that his recommendations in future will be guided by these arrangements. A persistent mutilator of books in one of our branch libraries escaped punishment last winter because the custodian of the reading-room where he was caught did not wait until the leaf on which he was working was actually severed. Everyone is welcome. It has needed ages of social progress to establish the conditions of a safe individual liberty in the indulgence of the jocose temper. Otherwise, it is good for nothing; and you justly charge the author’s style with being loose, vague, flaccid and imbecil. This looks like elaboration and after-thought. But a humble individual, whose ideas were more enlarged, contended upwards of three hundred pounds worth of good had been effected; and the spot on that part of the coast is recognized to this day as Hewitt’s Bank. Those exalted stations may, no doubt, be completely degraded by vice and folly. It is strength of affection, guided by strength of understanding, that so powerfully attracts and binds society together. The moral order is still in the background, dimly perceived, even here: the fun of the thing is at bottom, as Lamb says, a sense of momentary escape from rules which we know cannot be set aside in the real world. The burthen of thought weighs down the body like a porter’s burthen. When the obsidian of the Yellowstone Park is found in Ohio, when the black slate of Vancouver’s Island is exhumed in Delaware, it is obvious we must assume for such extensive transits a very noticeable ?sthetic and commercial development. Are either of these points of view justified? That they may bind to their throats the tongues of the men who have committed this theft, or consented thereto. In all the pure and ancient Algonkin cosmogonical legends, this divinity creates the world by his magic powers, peoples it with game and animals, places man upon it, teaches his favorite people the arts of the chase, and gives them the corn and beans. I should say then that setting aside what is of a purely physical, or (for aught I can tell) instinctive nature in the case, the influence of appetite over our volitions may be accounted for consistently enough with the foregoing hypothesis from the natural effects of a particularly irritable state of bodily feeling, rendering the idea of that which will heighten and gratify it’s susceptibility of pleasurable feeling, or remove some painful feeling proportionably vivid, and the object of a more vehement desire than can be excited by the same idea, when the body is supposed to be in a state of indifference, or only ordinary sensibility to that particular kind of gratification. THE WRITING AND RECORDS OF THE ANCIENT MAYAS.[215] _1.—Introductory._ One of the ablest living ethnologists has classified the means of recording knowledge under two general headings—Thought-writing and Sound-writing.[216] The former is again divided into two forms, the first and earliest of which is by pictures, the second by picture-writing. By supposing, that in the solidity of the Sphere of each of the Five Planets there was formed another little Sphere, called an Epicycle, which revolved round its own centre, at the same time that it was carried round the centre of the Earth by the revolution of the great Sphere, betwixt whose concave and convex sides it was inclosed; in the same manner as we might suppose a little wheel inclosed within the outer circle of a great wheel, and which whirled about several times upon its own axis, while its centre was carried round the axis of the great wheel, they imagined they could account for the retrograde and stationary appearances of those most irregular objects in the heavens. Few canting arms, however, are so perfect as these. The orators of the earlier and ruder ages of Rome could not probably, consistent with the manners of the times, have expressed themselves with so much emotion. essays samples descriptive.